coffee lovers

It seems that stories like I’m about to share always begin with,
“I just ran to the other room for a second . . . ”

And that’s what I had done.

I was getting Josiah set up for a snack, pushed him up to the table, and then just ran to the other room for a SECOND . . . to give one of the girls a reminder, or to put something away . . . I don’t even remember.

I hear the clattery bang, and then some splashing, and return to find this:

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That mug in the lower right hand corner, which astoundingly remains unharmed, was just moments prior on the table, full of lukewarm coffee.  And evidently, well within reach of what we’ve begun to refer to as “the power arm.”

Just because his left arm doesn’t end in a hand, it doesn’t mean that Josiah hasn’t already, at age one, found ways to use it powerfully and effectively.  (And destructively)

Perhaps because this is kid #3 . . . I find myself a bit more low-key at such moments.  So, I took the time to soak the moment in . . . while little Josiah soaked himself in my precious Starbucks coffee.

Surprisingly, the gray and white striped onesie made it through the incident unscathed.

an apple a day . . .

I mentioned in my last post that our little man loves to eat.  But sometimes in all that eagerness, he goes a bit too fast, swallowing things whole and forgetting to use those 8 little teeth.

Earlier this week, a friend mentioned that giving Josiah a whole apple might be a great way for him to practice some of those biting and chewing skills, AND a great way to keep him busy for a while.

So on Tuesday, I peeled an apple and sat him in his booster chair, hoping he’d be entertained for 10 minutes or so – enough time for me to do a few things in the kitchen.

It took some time for him to master picking up the slippery apple and getting it to his mouth.  This was clearly the first time he’d had the opportunity for an independent apple eating experience. This test of motor skills kept him busy and focused for a good 5 minutes.  And then . . . he did it!  That first tiny little bite of apple brought a huge grin, and he was off . . .

And not for just 10 minutes, either.

When I looked at the clock and realized he’d been busy at work on that apple for THIRTY minutes, I went to grab the camera.

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Oh – he is so funny!

He looks like he might be nearly finished here . . . but oh no . . . he was just taking a little breather!  When it was all said and done, Josiah worked on that apple for one hour and 15 minutes!

HA!

A healthy snack, practice in motor skills and biting and chewing, and I get uninterrupted time to do the dishes and start dinner.

A grand success!

french toast

Josiah has proven to be a VERY happy eater, and digs into most anything we give him to try.  If I am feeding him, he often shouts between bites because I’m not able to feed him as quickly as he desires.  If I need to return to the kitchen to refill his bowl, the moments he’s required to wait nearly put him over the edge!

He is ever so gradually becoming more patient, but in the meantime, it’s just fun to have such an eager eater at the table.  His diet at the orphanage consisted mostly of congee, formula, and cookies, so we’re guessing that many of the things he is now eating are brand new.

Here are some shots of his first experience with French toast (sans butter and syrup, for now.)

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I think he gives it a thumbs up!

teacher training

It seems that from the time that she could talk and hold some sort of writing utensil, Grace has been pretending to be a teacher.  Even when she was just four, she would play school by herself and fill the white board with word lists and numbers.  This particular photo is one of my all time favorites — those backwards Js, creative math facts, and chubby cheeks add some special charm!  (if you know Chinese hand symbols for numbers, you may understand how counting on your fingers might lead a 4-year old to think that 6+6=4!)

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During her kindergarten year, her school play became a bit more involved.  She chose several of her stuffed animals as her students and created take-home folders for each.  Each animal’s folder had its own calendar, behavior chart, and a place for journaling. Of course, the animals did need a little help to actually write in their journals.  Here is a shot of her helping Dino with his work. She told me she had to write a little messy on purpose, so that it would really look like HIS writing, and not hers.  “He’s still just learning,” she’d say.

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This weekend she was playing school again.  When I saw the math chart I remembered the one from years ago and snapped a picture for a point of comparison.  She does come from a long line of teachers, so who knows . . . perhaps she will put these skills to use in the classroom one day!

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